Pumping can make high-lift grouting economical. Many contractors use pumps to place grout in hollow masonry units and in specialty units like pilasters.

HOW PUMPS WORK

Most grout pumps are two-cylinder piston pumps. Though pumps made different manufacturers vary a lot, they have the same basic components: a feeding hopper equipped with an agitator, inlet and outlet valves, twin-cylinder pistons, and a power source.

HOW TO CHOOSE A PUMP

For a given grouting job, a pump can be chosen to maximize output for a determined line pressure. However, as job conditions and projects vary so do the line pressure requirements. Therefore, choose a pump that's versatile in project application and in pumping different mixes.

PLANNING MAKES PROFITS

To determine the best way to use a pump call a pre-pumping meeting. Proper planning of pump locations, grout supply, hose or pipeline, placing sequence, and cleanup saves time and money.

LUBRICATE THE LINE

The pump and lines must be adequately lubricated or pumping is impossible. Before grout is discharged into the pump hopper, spray 3 or 4 gallons of water into the hopper followed by a cement slurry, 1/2 bag of cement mixed with 5 gallons of water.

HOW TO CLEAR BLOCKAGES

Typically, grout mixes are wet enough to be easily pumped; however, line blockages may still occur. Line blockages are costly. If a line blockage occurs in the hose, locate the blockage by walking on top of the hose. The hose should be soft immediately past the hard blockage. Using a hammer or 2x4, pound the downstream end of the blockage until the grout flows freely.