Launch Slideshow

Rudd Residence Fireplace

Rudd Residence Fireplace

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Summary

Category: Fireplace
Location: Tomah, WI
Size: 5,600 sq. ft.
Masonry Used: Glacier stone Natural stone thin veneer Bighorn Blend 500 sq/ft flat stone, 200 in/ft corner stone, 46 special pieces for hearth, caps, trim stones. The stone was selected to include 45% burgundy/rust color, and trim stones caps and hearths were selected for their vibrant colors.
Submitted by: Design Masonry LLC

Project Description

Design Masonry, LLC was contracted by the home owner, Kelly Rudd, to lay 4800 Sq. Ft. of Owens Corning Country Ledge Stone Chardonnay/Aspen mix on the exterior of residence under construction in 2010. I was asked from the start of the project to design a stone fireplace for the Great room, a fireplace not like the normal fireplace but one that is unique. Taking into consideration the size of the room, the arches in the design of the home, and the Rudd's interests fostered the design. The stone was chosen to compliment the knotty walnut floor, the alder wood trim, and the view of the cranberry mashes that the room overlooks. We chose to work with the Glacier stone to keep the trim and hearth stones to be the dark brown and burgundy and the laying stone to keep a 45% burgundy blend. We had some issues that had to be overcome. The main issue was that to put a floor to ceiling fireplace in a room with these dimensions could have been overbearing so we designed many different depths and details into it. An additional issue was the utilities that we had to deal with. These included 3 other fireplaces in the home and the only cold air return for the upper floor that also occupy this same chase. We also had to incorporate two hidden access panels within the face of the fireplace.

We drew up several plans similar in design but adjusting the upper valance to proportionately fit the room. The final plan I came up with was a fireplace that would have three arches, a double mantle, pillars, and an inset. The top mantle is like a valance that covers over the lower fireplace and hearth. This allows for directional accent lighting up and down. Accenting the valance arch are 22 trim stones with a key stone and stone return on the bottom side. On top of the valance, the shelf area is over 16 feet wide and ranges from 22 inches deep in the center and 40 inches deep on the sides for future animal mounts. The top valance is supported by 2 stone pillars at the base and an 11inch round alder wood pillar between two 4inch thick solid stones. The lower mantle is a smaller version of the upper valance. The hearth consists of 5 inch thick stone that is hand fitted around the pillars and the profiles of the fireplace. The upper inset has an Alder wood insert and is 7 inches deep with a 4 inch thick one piece stone.

To complete this project inside to keep the cutting dust to a minimum we used a Jac-Vac 360. We also used a splitter that we fabricated to mechanically split natural stone thin veneer it weighs only 38 lbs. and takes up 10 inches if scaffolding area.

Project Participants

  • Owner: Kelly Rudd, Cranberry Central Inc.
  • Architect/Desinger: Daniel Peltier, Design Masonry LLC
  • Masonry Contractor: Daniel Peltier, Design Masonry LLC
  • Masonry Supplier: Tony Kavanagh, Glacier Stone Supply LLC