The Aldo Leopold Legacy Center, designed by Kubala Washatko Architects, is the highest rated LEED project in the U.S. Masonry contributed 35 LEED points to the project after masonry contractor Rick Scaife convinced the architect to use reclaimed stone.
The Aldo Leopold Legacy Center, designed by Kubala Washatko Architects, is the highest rated LEED project in the U.S. Masonry contributed 35 LEED points to the project after masonry contractor Rick Scaife convinced the architect to use reclaimed stone.

The International Masonry Institute holds its fourth Masonry for Sustainability conference of 2009 in Chicago on Sept. 9. The program is open to architects, designers, engineers, developers and building owners, and will address the new version of LEED that debuted in April.

The seminar will identify the contributions that masonry can make in five LEED categories: sustainable sites, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, and innovation and design.

The third version of LEED is not a dramatic change but is a reorganization of the ratings system. LEED 2009 has three changes to the existing format. The first consolidates all commercial and institutional rating systems, making LEED credits consistent across all formats. The two biggest changes are new credit weightings that emphasize reduction, energy efficiency and CO2 and regionalizing of the LEED system. In the regionalization, specific regional environmental issues have been identified and regional priority credits have been assigned for each state.

The new version of LEED will be comprehensively introduced at the seminar. The integration of masonry into LEED 2009 will also be discussed. For more, visit the institute's Web site at www.imiweb.org to register.